Sculptor, Isaac Cordal’s brilliant work uses small-scale figurines to make a big statement about his concern for societies relationship with our leaders, our environment, technology and each other.

Nadav Kurtz’s short film Paraiso documents the hard work of Mexican immigrants (two brothers and their cousin) who day-in, day-out take huge risks hanging high above the Chicago skyline to clean the windows of the city. They do this with their families in mind. They do this for security and survival. Like many immigrants, they do the work that others don’t want to do.

In advance of the upcoming Nine Inch Nails album, Trent Reznor teamed up with David Lynch for the making of the video for the first single, Came Back Haunted. The track’s character seems to harken back to some of the band’s earlier sounds and the video does the same with regards to Lynch’s earlier experimental filmworks. So, it’s a fitting pairing to see Lynch and Reznor collaborating again.

Celia Rowlson-Hall is a filmmaker, dancer, and choreographer. There’s a great sense of whimsy to her work that reminds me of all that I love about Miranda July’s projects. My favorite piece of hers thus far is a short performance film that pokes some fun at the absurdities of The Audition process. I hope to one day collaborate with her.

I can recall the first time I came across Dan Flavin’s artwork in person. I was completely enamored by it and still am. Yet, I’d struggle to explain exactly what it is that I’m so compelled by in his work. More interesting to me than what an adult would have to say of his work is what a child might have to say. Here are 3 minutes worth of kid’s opinions on an untitled Dan Flavin piece that was installed in their Liverpool school for one day.

Nine months ago, my wife and I adopted a pit bull from a local Brooklyn rescue organization doing amazing work. The shelter, Sean Casey Animal Rescue places over 100 dogs a month in homes and is widely considered the best operation of it’s type in New York City. They’re a no kill facility and only take-in animals that they believe can be re-homed. When we first went to visit the shelter and look at the available dogs, we were immediately drawn to a rather large pit bull named Judson. He eventually came home with us, and with a quick name change to Jax, he became a member of our family. At just 9 months old, he was already one of the largest dogs there. He looked so big in his crate that I didn’t even realize that he was puppy. While most of the dogs barked in a chorus begging to be chosen for the chance to have a walk and stretch their legs, Jax was calm. He licked our fingers over and over through the metal grid that separated us. But the thing that most attracted us to him was his stunning appearance - all white with brown pinto spots, yellow eyes and a pink nose. Suddenly, our plan to adopt a dog closer to 2 years old was awry.  We took him for a walk around the block. He had no idea how to walk on a leash. He bounced around springing high in the air. It was evident that (like all dogs) this was going to be serious work.

We thought that we should take a few dogs out in hopes of discovering some unknown detail that might help us figure out which one to take home. When the decision came down to two dogs (both pit bulls), we were finding it quite hard to decide which one was right for us. Pak was a slightly older, very mellow dog who was all black with a white chest and feet. I went back to the shelter every day for a week and spent an hour with each dog with the hopes that I might learn something about them, that one would give me the signal that I needed. The workers at the shelter could see that I was determined to rescue one of them, but was struggling with how to decide. Without pressuring, they gave their opinion that Pak was the right one. I asked question after question. Did they think Pak would be rescued soon, as he had already been there a few months longer than Jax? The answer - “It’s hard to say. Black dogs are much harder to place.”

My reason for posting this is simple. Even when deciding which dog to rescue, appearance, color of the fur is a major determining factor in which dogs will find a new home. As I mentioned, Sean Casey places over a hundred dogs a month. Nine months later, Pak (a sweet and very well behaved dog) has yet to find a home.

Today, I discovered LaNola Stone’s photo project Least Likely To Be Adopted. The idea was to take “fashionesque images” of the longest running residents of her local shelter. She photographed portraits of the dogs which were believed to be least likely to be adopted. After these images which display a sense of personality were taken, each dog was adopted.

(via Design Observer)