Some location scout shots that I snapped from this week’s shoot in Cabo San Lucas, Mexico. Got to finish the project with a fantastic meal at a really unique restaurant, Flora Farms.

Alan Wolfson is a native New Yorker who has spent decades creating miniature urban sculptures that recall the changing landscape of NYC. Often, he creates with painstaking detail models of places that have actually existed, like Katz’s Deli (below).

Similarly, Michael Paul Smith creates scale model nostalgic environments that he photographs in a manner that would make you swear they’re real. All of the images that he creates are of a fantasy town that he’s named Elgin Park.

I’ve always been bothered by the the sexist trope in which women are posed suggestively to highlight a stereotypically “masculine” object of desire such as a car, motorcycle or a guitar. I was particularly amused by this series of ads in which a Portland-based Ducati dealer paired images of men from around their shop in contrast to their female model counterparts. I think it does a good job to point out just how absurd the cliche is.

Photographer Chris Arnade has spent several years documenting the people who live in New York City’s poorest neighborhood and not surprisingly where the best quality of heroin is to be found, Hunt’s Point. His deep commitment to revealing certain truths about the relationship between addiction, abuse and poverty is clear in a large body of work, as we can see his intimate rapport with the subjects. He simply sees them as “human beings,” people in a bad place and in need of help that probably isn’t coming. While most of America spends their Christmas and Thanksgiving holidays with their loved ones, Arnade huddles up in the cold, under highway overpasses with those whose lives are most destitute - 16 year old prostitutes, heroin and crack addicts, those that society would rather not recognize. Accompanying the photos of the flickr page for his Faces of Addiction series, are text entries that provide a greater understanding on the background of each image’s subject. This is some of the best photo-journalism that I’ve seen in a long time. More words and pictures from the series can be found on an accompanying blog. This one particularly poignant entry struck me hard. It gives insight into the creation of a prison class of people, and the design of a process made intentionally difficult to communicate with them.